Western can remain strong: Cox

TIM Cox believes Western Zone has the ability to remain competitive in future seasons after taking out the NSW Country Cricket Championship final.

Western Zone last won the title in 2002 and struggled before finishing as runners-up in 2011.

On Sunday Western downed Central Coast by two wickets to claim the 2012 title at Orange's Wade Park. Cox, the Western Zone chairman of selectors, believes it is the players who missed out on the representative side which make him confident future teams will remain competitive.

"It's good to see, from a selector's point of view, the guys who do miss out, there's a wealth of talent out there," Cox said after Sunday's win.

"I think I said when I announced the side here, the talent that has come from the three councils this year was a much higher level than has been in previous years. The guys who've made themselves available are a great credit to their associations."

Western Zone captain Pat Rosser, who was on Monday named in the NSW Country side along with Orange's Trent Colley, said it had taken time to develop the successful team.

"It had a lot to do with our plans and our processes off the field," Rosser explained.

"We had to show the younger guys how to plan and prepare. It's been a couple of years of hard work off the field to nurture these guys through.

"I think in the (Southern pool) carnival to get here we stuck together and we stuck to a simple plan when we were under pressure and we got through because we had a plan B."

Rosser was impressed with the entire team but the side's younger players stood out to him during the Southern pool carnival and the final.

"Everyone across the carnival has chipped in at some point," he said. "Blokes like Liam Gough (Orange) took 10 wickets - he's 17, he's a kid. Joey Kershaw (Cowra) didn't get much of a bowl in Wagga but came out today (Sunday) and had a great little innings (28) to help us win the game. He bowled well too. They're only young fellas and they've just won a Country Championship."

Rosser said Western's strong performances in the last two Country Championships meant they would be closely watched in the future.

"I think up until the last couple of years we've always been seen as the easy beats," he said.

"I think we've got a bit of credibility now. On paper we might not be the best team but we work really hard."

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