Timbrebongie House is a community project which was built for the frail aged

HOMELY AND SUPPORTIVE: Timbrebongie is home to 47 residents. There are 30 hostel rooms, one respite room and 16 rooms in the secured wing.
HOMELY AND SUPPORTIVE: Timbrebongie is home to 47 residents. There are 30 hostel rooms, one respite room and 16 rooms in the secured wing.

WEEKLY excursions, bingo and shoot 'n' shuffle matches are just some of the regular activities enjoyed by residents at Timbrebongie House.

The aged care facility in Narromine, about 40 kilometres west of Dubbo, welcomed its first residents in January, 1990.

"Timbrebongie House is a community project which was built for the frail aged in the local area to allow our residents to remain near their families while receiving quality care consistent with their needs," chief executive John Sevil said.

"Timbrebongie provides a homelike residence for 47 residents. There are 30 hostel rooms, one respite room and 16 rooms in the secured wing. Ageing in place is practised."

In all, Timbrebongie is home to 47 residents and 57 staff are employed to take care of them.

There is a secure wing for dementia residents.

"Working in the Narromine community brings a sense of achievement in providing much needed care and support to the elderly community of Narromine and surrounding district," Mr Sevil said.

"The staff and residents participate in local community events such as Naidoc Week, Anzac Day celebrations and Seniors' Week." Staff at Timbrebongie aim to ensure residents receive quality care, with privacy and dignity, in a safe home-like environment.

The House is set in extensive gardens and has courtyards for the residents' enjoyment. It is located within easy walking distance of a convenience store and is next to the Narromine Hospital. There is a community bus for residents who need to travel to Dubbo.

"The original section of 31 rooms was built as a result of a concerted community fund raising effort in the Narromine area," Mr Sevil said.

"The funds, together with some government assistance, and a generous donation from Royal Freemasons Benevolent Society, saw the facility open its doors to the first residents in January 1990.

"[Then] the need for higher care and a secure dementia wing was identified, and with further fundraising and a grant from the Department of Veterans' Affairs the additional wing opened in 2002."

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