Break and enter three times NSW average: BOCSAR

TAKING ACTION: NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller at Dubbo Police Station earlier in the year. The Commissioner said the BOCSAR results showed there was still work to be done in regional areas. Photo: JENNIFER HOAR
TAKING ACTION: NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller at Dubbo Police Station earlier in the year. The Commissioner said the BOCSAR results showed there was still work to be done in regional areas. Photo: JENNIFER HOAR

Houses in Dubbo are being broken into more than three times as often as the rest of NSW.

The latest figures from the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research show the rate of recorded criminal incidents per 100,000 people. It covers the 12 months to June 2018.

During the 12 months, the rate of break and enters to dwellings was 3.6 times higher than the NSW average. There were 644 incidents, which equates to more than 12 break and enters each week in the Dubbo Local Government Area.

Break and enters to non-dwellings were almost three times higher than the average at 199 incidents.

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The amount of malicious damage to property during the year was 2.7 times higher than the state.

Cars have also been a target. There were 210 motor vehicle thefts, which is 2.4 times higher than average. There were also 668 incidents of steal from motor vehicle. Thefts from motor vehicles were 2.6 times higher than the rest of NSW.

Assault is no different. In all four assault categories Dubbo is at least double the average.

Indecent assault is 2.5 times as high, domestic violence-related assault is 2.2 times as high and non-domestic related assault is double the average.

In the 12 months, there were an average of eight domestic violence-related assaults each week. The number of reported incidents was almost identical to the number of non-domestic violence-related assault.

There is more work to do to reduce theft offences, particularly in some regional areas...

Mick Fuller

There were 80 reported cases of sexual assault in the local government area, 2.1 times higher than average.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said the public has greater confidence in alerting police to incidents partly due to recent social campaigns drawing attention to these types of crimes.

“A number of successful police investigations and a well-publicised Royal Commission into historical offences has had a significant impact on increased reporting,” Commissioner Fuller said.

But more there’s still areas to improve.

“There is more work to do to reduce theft offences, particularly in some regional areas but with more police on the ground in communities across NSW, criminals should be worried,” Commissioner Fuller said.

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