OUR SAY: Perhaps the donkey could do a better job?

A rubbish bag is seen in the chamber after a vote to adjourn the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch
A rubbish bag is seen in the chamber after a vote to adjourn the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Sometime before May next year we will be going to the polls.  

Given what’s taking up the most space on national media at the moment, I am starting to consider my vote. We’ll get fined for not voting, so I am wondering if the donkey vote is the best way to go.

Because when it comes to politics, are the politicians the majority of Australians elected really listening to what we, the public, want? Right now, stability would be number one on the list of wants. Or should I just expect the current state of the so-called 'leadership crisis’ to be our stability? I say ‘so-called’ because today is starting to feel like any other day in parliament from where we are sitting right now. 

It’s been over 11 years since we’ve had a prime minister actually survive their full term in parliament. So I think that justifies the argument all this going on in parliament at the moment could be just any other day. 

I remember sitting in an economics class during high school and my teacher taking about all things government and saying the best thing a government could do was look at the long term future, but they would never do that because they might not get in for the next term and the other side would claim it – he sure got the ‘never do that’ part right when it comes to the current group.

At that time I had already developed an idea of politics something similar to a class of screaming children (without the screams, and with people who should be a lot more sensible). As this same situation has unfolded in Canberra over the past few weeks my idea of politics and political parties has only been strengthened. 

These people are meant to be running our country – last time I voted, I voted because I thought that’s what they were meant to be doing on behalf of the taxpayers that they were representing. So why can’t they just get on with the job of running the country? Why do they have to keep fighting among themselves instead of doing the job they are being paid for – by us (the taxpayer that is). 

Depending on what happens in the next we could be called to an election sooner rather than later. Though, again depending, we expect those in parliament may want to leave it as long as possible so the public can forget about this little ‘leadership crisis’.

Come election time, whenever that may be I’ll be thinking long and hard about what we put on that paper when we go into vote. 

Perhaps the donkey so many vote for could do a better job?