Delroy Campus students race using Co2 powered miniature racing cars

Delroy Year 8 students Douglas Willis and Logan Windsor, together with TAS head teacher James Peter, prepare cars to race
Delroy Year 8 students Douglas Willis and Logan Windsor, together with TAS head teacher James Peter, prepare cars to race

Dubbo College students put their Co2-powered miniature racing cars to the test in the Delroy Campus school hall, thanks to the talents and experience of a new teacher to the college this year.

Technological and applied studies head teacher James Peter has been organising Co2 challenges for about 10 years at schools including Yeoval and Peak Hill.

This year at Dubbo College, Mr Peter decided to implement the program with his year 8 technology mandatory class and the students tackled the challenge with great excitement.

“The technology students were joined in the program by a group of Year 7 and 8 support unit students, with all focused on developing the fastest miniature racing car possible,” Mr Peter said.

“It was highly competitive with some students taking into account all aspects of aerodynamics and others more focused on the physical appearance of the car.

“They all manufactured their vehicles from balsa wood and we purchased in supplies of plastic wheels and axels and used an eyelet screw to race the cars along a string line in the hall.

“We raced off two vehicles at a time with the cars propelled by Co2 canisters, like those used in one-shot soda stream devices.

“During a time frame of a couple of hours we eliminated the slower cars in a knockout competition, eventually coming up with the two fastest for the final race.”

Mr Peter said year 8 student William Stenhouse developed the fastest car, beating Zac Watson in the final.

“Students aspired to design their cars with the least wind resistance possible and some students believed a lighter car would be fastest,” he said.

“Others hypothesised that a shorter car would move through the air quickest.

“Mid-way through the races, some students began to believe one side of the race track was faster than the other but this theory was discounted.

“Attention to detail in the construction of the cars proved critical, with some vehicles crashing and losing wheels as the racing progressed.”