Red Nose Day celebrates 30 years by announcing three new research projects for 2018.

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Red Nose’s work in the past 30 years has been instrumental in reducing the number of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy in Australia by 85 per cent, saving close to 10,000 lives. Ongoing public support of their biggest fundraiser, Red Nose Day, is crucial however to raise funds for these projects, and help them reduce the nine children’s deaths per day that are still happening, to zero. 

MAKING A MARK: To celebrate the 30th anniversary of Red Nose Day on June 29, the charity has announced three new imminent research and education projects.

MAKING A MARK: To celebrate the 30th anniversary of Red Nose Day on June 29, the charity has announced three new imminent research and education projects.

As Red Nose Day celebrates its 30th anniversary on June 29, the organisation is continuing the fight for babies’ lives with three new life-saving projects. A research project focused on reducing late-term stillbirth from 28 weeks gestation will explore maternal sleep position in late pregnancy as being a potential risk factor for stillbirth, and whether sleeping on your right side is a risk factor. 

Red Nose’s other key projects for 2018 include a SIDS book and a Safe Sleeping e-Learning course for early childhood educators.

Chair of the Red Nose board Craig Heatley got involved with the charity following the devastating death of his daughter Charlotte who was stillborn at 35 weeks in 2007, and his son Cameron who passed away from a suspected febrile convulsion in 2009. 

"At a routine doctor’s visit, we found out our daughter Charlotte's heart had stopped beating and my wife Lara would need to be induced,” says Craig. “She was 35 weeks. The whole experience was heartbreaking. We had gone from hope and sense of great expectation to despair. The hardest part was not having answers as to why this happened.

Red Nose’s other key projects for 2018 include a SIDS book and a Safe Sleeping e-Learning course for early childhood educators.

"In 2008 we were fortunate to have twins, a boy, Cameron and girl, Addison. Unfortunately in December 2009 we found our son in his cot unresponsive and not breathing. He had passed away from a suspected febrile compulsion at the age of 22 months. As you could imagine, my wife and I were devastated. To lose two children in a little under three years was any parent’s worst nightmare.”

Craig’s journey led him to Red Nose, becoming Chair of the Red Nose board in 2017. “My purpose is to do whatever I can so other parents don’t have to go through the absolute heartbreak my family have endured. 

"Red Nose relies on funding to conduct projects such as this one focused on late-term stillbirth, and we are confident it will provide answers and lead to a reduction in late-term stillbirths. Funds raised go to projects like these ones, so Red Nose can conduct critical research to prevent these deaths."

For more information, visit rednoseday.com.au.