Climate forecast shows it’s going to get hot, hot, hot |Maps

CLIMATE CHANGES: Forecasts have been made for the temperature and rainfall changes in Dubbo in the next fifty years. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE
CLIMATE CHANGES: Forecasts have been made for the temperature and rainfall changes in Dubbo in the next fifty years. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Dubbo and the surrounding region is expected to get significantly hotter in the next 50 years.

Information released by the NSW government’s Office of Environment and Heritage shows the Central West and Orana will have 27 days per year above 35 degrees Celsius by 2070. In 13 years, there will be an average of nine more days above 35.

Forbes, Parkes and Dubbo currently experience 20 to 30 hot days per year, according to the report. In Nyngan there are more than 50 hot days per year.

“International and Australian experiences show that prolonged hot days increase the incidence of illness and death, particularly among vulnerable population groups such as people who are older, have a pre-existing medical condition or who have a disability,” the report states.

“Seasonal changes are likely to have considerable impacts on bush fire danger, infrastructure development and native species diversity.”

The mean maximum temperature for Dubbo is also expected to increase.

In spring and summer the temperature is projected to rise between 2.5 and three degrees, while in winter and autumn a one to 1.5 degree increase is predicted.

There will also be fewer cold nights by 2070, especially in winter. The Blue Mountains and the Central Tablelands are expected to have the greatest change with 20 to 30 fewer nights under two degrees.

The climate change report has predicted between 10 to 20 fewer cold days in Dubbo.

When it comes to rainfall, in the Central West and Orana there will most likely see a decrease in the amount of rain that falls in spring and an increase in the autumn rain.

Parkes, Forbes and Cowra are predicted to have the greatest reduction in rainfall during spring. However the report shows the increase in autumn rain is expected across the whole region.

“Changes in rainfall patterns have the potential for widespread impacts. Seasonal shifts in rainfall can impact native species’ reproductive cycles a well as impacting agricultural productivity; for example, crops that are reliant on winter rains for peak growth,” the report states.