Complexity of superannuation likely to make scheme unappealing to first home buyers

Matt Wright
Matt Wright

A scheme that would allow first home buyers to save $30,000 through voluntary tax-free superannuation contributions is due to be tabled in federal parliament this week.

But the likely defeat of the bill won’t have dire consequences for those looking to get into the market, according to Dubbo mortgage broker Matt Wright.

The ‘Super Savers’ scheme has invoked debate from all sides of politics, with senators Jacqui Lambie, Cory Bernardi and David Leyonhjelm all publicly casting doubts on its effectiveness.

And Mr Wright has added to that chorus, saying he doesn’t think it would have much effect on locals looking to purchase their first property.

“There’s a lot of complexity when it comes to superannuation, and what we tend to find is that first home buyers in particular don’t want complexity when they’re purchasing a property,” he said.

“So whether the amount up to $30,000 is saved via super contributions or just saved in a regular account, there still has to be a level of discipline involved in saving the money and a normal account is much easier to get access to.

There’s a lot of complexity when it comes to superannuation, and what we tend to find is that first home buyers in particular don’t want complexity when they’re purchasing a property

Matt Wright

“Since July 1 when the state government removed stamp duty for established hom we’ve seen a big pick up in interest, where previously it was at a point where people were preferring to buy a block and build, which is hard for someone entering the market.”

In a strong Dubbo market, Mr Wright said he has seen a big spike in interest from first home owners making use of the stamp duty exemptions, with most of them working in a range from $280,000 to $300,000.

He added that ‘abnormally’ low interest rates are also playing a role in helping young people get involved in the property market.