Dubbo's links to criminal history explored in heritage encounter

On the trail: Western Plains Cultural Centre's Andrew Glassop reveals the city's dark past to Margaret and Bede Sheridan. Photo: FAYE WHEELER
On the trail: Western Plains Cultural Centre's Andrew Glassop reveals the city's dark past to Margaret and Bede Sheridan. Photo: FAYE WHEELER

Dubbo’s dark and dangerous criminal history has some pulling power.

The chance to discover more about the topic lured about 30 people to the city’s centre on Saturday.

The Friends of the Western Plains Cultural Centre’s ‘Heritage Encounter: Exploring Dubbo’s dark criminal trail’ included stops outside the Old Dubbo Gaol and the city’s historic courthouse.

The free event was led by Western Plains Cultural Centre manager Andrew Glassop.

The first stop focused on John Dunn, a member of Ben Hall’s gang, who spent some nights at the Dubbo lock-up before escaping.

He was recaptured, tried for murdering a constable and sentenced to death, aged 19.

Participants also discovered spine-chilling details about Albert Moss, aka Mad Mossy who was one of Dubbo Gaol's most infamous prisoners.

Convicted of murder in 1939, the swagman claimed to have killed "a baker's dozen" - if true, this would make him one the worst serial killers in Australian history, Mr Glassop says.

The colourful characters continued with Dubbo-born-and-bred underworld queen Kate Leigh.

The city’s link to a significant point in Australia’s criminal history was also explored in the encounter.

Born in an unassuming house on Bourke Street, Dubbo, Jean Lee was the last woman to be hanged in Australia in 1951 for her role in the murder of an elderly bookmaker in Melbourne.