Marathon Health tells Dubbo residents 'Let's Talk Diabetes'

Marathon Health is urging Dubbo residents to speak to its nationally-accredited staff about a “silent killer” that’s on the rise in Australia and the Central West.

TALK TO US: Diabetes educator Alison Amor encourages use of Marathon Health's Let's Talk Diabetes Facebook page. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

TALK TO US: Diabetes educator Alison Amor encourages use of Marathon Health's Let's Talk Diabetes Facebook page. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

In the lead-up to World Diabetes Day on Tuesday, the not-for-profit primary healthcare provider reports of face-to-face and social media options for seeking advice.

Residents who have been diagnosed with diabetes, have a loved one suffering from the disease or are concerned about developing it, are being encouraged to make an appointment at the Marathon Health clinic in Talbragar Street.

They can also go to the Let’s Talk Diabetes Facebook page  that provides information and “direct access” to diabetes educators.

Marathon Health diabetes educator Alison Amor is part of a team “able to provide education around all areas of diabetes”.

“Diabetes is a concern for all Australians, particularly type 2 diabetes which represents about 85 to 90 per cent of all cases of diabetes,” she said.  “Research indicates that the risk for developing type 2 diabetes can be reduced through simple lifestyle modifications.

“We know the prevalence of diabetes is increasing in Australia, so we encourage anyone who has any questions, concerns or is just after some support, to make an appointment with us.”

READ MORE: Sugar levy on drinks to combat diabetes and Campaign launched to improve diabetes awareness.

Fellow diabetes educator Lesley Wilcox reports of the team establishing a social media presence and launching a newsletter to “better help, support and educate people about diabetes”.

“Our Facebook page, Let’s Talk Diabetes, receives a lot of positive feedback from clients and community members alike,” she said. “It’s a judgement-free space where anyone can come and better understand diabetes and ask any question they may have.”

Ms Wilcox said diabetes was “unfortunately becoming more and more common”. “So it’s important to be able to have an open dialogue and provide a supportive environment to assist people manage their diabetes.” For more information about diabetes programs or to book an appointment, call 1300 402 585.