Rain for a few of the driest areas after a long wait

RAIN HOPES: Producers in some of the driest areas have seen some reasonably good falls of rain, but much more is needed for even a half decent spring season. Photo: FILE.
RAIN HOPES: Producers in some of the driest areas have seen some reasonably good falls of rain, but much more is needed for even a half decent spring season. Photo: FILE.

Some reasonably good falls of rain of been recorded mainly around the Queensland/NSW border areas and further to the north of these falls.

My man in south east Queensland received 55mm over the long weekend with further falls predicted.

Parts of western Queensland were thought to have been the beneficiary of 150mm.

Certainly, rain events of this magnitude were apparently patchy and were the result of scattered storms.

The top end of the New England region also fared well with the Inverell cattle sale reporting greatly reduced numbers due to 20–30mm in the district prior to their Tuesday market.

East of Dubbo around Coonabarabran and Binnaway, some lucky land owners saw tallies from 127mm to 190mm. These falls are only a start and much more is required if we are going to enjoy a half decent spring.

High profile Blaney Agent Ben Emms, of Ray White Emms Mooney, as well as having achieved wide-ranging success and accolades within the agency industry has recently added another string to his list of achievements.

Sale yard chatter tells the column that Ben has been selected to compete in one of the firearms disciplines at the next Commonwealth games to be held in Brisbane in 2018.

There is considerable angst at the moment between beef procedures and MLA/NLRs over the weekly national kill figures supplied voluntarily by processors.

Only last week Queensland kill figures were originally quoted at 72,000, quickly adjusted down to 70,255 and finally down to slightly above 66,000 head.  One Queensland processor thought the actual numbers should be close to 55,000 head.

Why some companies continue to misreport their tallies is still a mystery unless in some way they hope to boost their standing within the industry.

Where this action does cause some problems is for the sales team who are endeavouring to sell beef into a competitive global market.

These inflated figures give buyers the idea that there is more beef in the supply chain than is being quoted.

This gives buyers a sense of security and makes it much harder for salesmen to achieve a stronger price for our commodity. So far no one is shooting home any blame but surely with all the recording of PIC numbers, NVDs etc a traceability system could be put in place.

NLRs make contact with all processors on a weekly basis but obviously have no way to confirm advised figures.

Dubbo on October 6 scanned 2830 head – a much reduced yarding. Rain in the air combined with the smaller offering saw prices rise from 10c to 25c/kg on some lines.