Dubbo part of Australia's 'maturing' drinking culture

TASTES CHANGING: DrinkWise ambassador Dr Andrew Rochford says Australians are "opting for lower-alcohol alternatives such as mid-strength beer".
TASTES CHANGING: DrinkWise ambassador Dr Andrew Rochford says Australians are "opting for lower-alcohol alternatives such as mid-strength beer".

New national data suggests more Dubbo residents are content with two standard drinks whenever they decide to imbibe.

DrinkWise has released Australian Drinking Habits 2007 vs 2017, showing 63 per cent of drinkers consume no more than two standards drinks currently, up from 48 per cent in 2007.

DrinkWise data shows Australia's drinking culture is "maturing".

DrinkWise data shows Australia's drinking culture is "maturing".

This year 16 per cent of drinkers are knocking back five or more standard drinks, down from 24 per cent 10 years ago. One in five Australians, or 20 per cent of the population, is abstaining from drinking alcohol in 2017, up from 11 per cent in 2007.

Six per cent of Australians are drinking daily in 2017, down from 9 per cent a decade ago. A weekly tipple is enjoyed by  37 per cent of Australians, down from 47 per cent in 2007. In 2017, 59 per cent of young people aged 16 to 17 reported of “never having consumed alcohol”.

DrinkWise, “dedicated to changing the Australian drink culture”, spent $100,000 on a 10-year study into the Australian drinking culture, summarised in the new report.

Its ambassador Dr Andrew Rochford said the nation’s drinking culture was “maturing” with people “interested in leading a healthy lifestyle”. “From a medical perspective, it’s also good to see an increasing number of Australians agree pregnant women shouldn’t drink alcohol.

“Most people are drinking at home, typically while enjoying a meal, and socialising with friends and family.  Our tastes are changing, too, and we’re opting for lower-alcohol alternatives such as mid-strength beer.”

DrinkWise accepts donations from “across the alcohol sector” and has been the recipient of government funding.

Most people are drinking at home, typically while enjoying a meal, and socialising with friends and family.

Dr Andrew Rochford