Adam King given funds, exhibition at Barangaroo

GROWING DEMAND: Ballimore artist Adam King with Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton after he was awarded a grant to grow Urban Sculpture Aboriginal Corporation. Photo: CONTRIBUTED

GROWING DEMAND: Ballimore artist Adam King with Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton after he was awarded a grant to grow Urban Sculpture Aboriginal Corporation. Photo: CONTRIBUTED

The work of Ballimore sculptor Adam King has joined artists from across NSW at an outdoor exhibition in Sydney.

Sculpture at Barangaroo, the free outdoor exhibition at Barangaroo Reserve, runs until August 20.

There are 14 artworks on display at the exhibition by nine established and emerging artists.

Mr King’s piece, Faces of Darug, is an archway which incorporates 54 profiles of Darug people from all ages. Each panel also includes a bird to symbolise Chris Burke, a puppeteer and advocate for youth welfare and children’s television.

Mr King was the recent recipient of a $202,000 grant through the Indigenous Entrepreneurs Package.

The funding will be used to support Urban Sculpture Aboriginal Corporation through the purchasing of a water-cutting machine, Metalmaster roll former and a forklift, as well as welding and cutting machinery.

“The purchase of this capacity-enhancing machinery will allow Urban Sculpture Aboriginal Corporation to meet the growing demand for its artwork pieces and to employ local jobseekers,” Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said.

“The funding will enable Mr King to employ an apprentice who can work beside him and learn the skills of industrial sculpting and metalwork.”

Previously Mr King had outsourced his metal cutting needs to third parties. He applying for the funding to purchase the equipment which would allow him to cut and produce the metalwork in-house.

Mr Coulton said the purchase of equipment would improve profitability, production turn-around time and the quality of the artwork, while also providing employment opportunities for local Aboriginal people.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion said there were many Indigenous entrepreneurs whose business ideas had the potential to transform their communities, they just needed a hand with the business assets to do the work.

“Through this funding package we are giving Indigenous entrepreneurs a fair go,” he said.

“We also know that successful Indigenous businesses are key to improving employment rates for First Australians,” he said.

Mr King’s Faces of Darug and the other works can be seen at any time before August 20, however visitors are encouraged to view the works between 8am and 6pm.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop