Dental Health Week: Dubbo dentist urges people to make time for tooth care

Check-up: Dr Grace Amey and Dr Nikita Randhawa get behind Dental Health Week's theme of 'Anywhere, Anytime: Oral Health for Busy Lives' and urge people to make time for their teeth. Photo: FAYE WHEELER

Check-up: Dr Grace Amey and Dr Nikita Randhawa get behind Dental Health Week's theme of 'Anywhere, Anytime: Oral Health for Busy Lives' and urge people to make time for their teeth. Photo: FAYE WHEELER

A Dubbo dentist is encouraging people to brush up on oral hygiene as a national survey shows concerning trends for tooth care.

Almost two-thirds of respondents in an Australian Dental Association (ADA) survey had not visited a dentist in more than two years, while 16 per cent said they didn’t have time to go to the dentist.

Dr Grace Amey is encouraging good oral health in her home town, where she is practising.

During Dental Health Week, she promoted the ADA’s message of the importance of taking time, no matter how busy life is.

“So essentially it’s all about how looking after your health needs to be a part of your everyday life,” she said.

“And we all lead really busy lives, we’ve got work commitments, kids, pets, sport, all kinds of things.

“But it’s just about taking that one or two minutes a day to be looking after your teeth.”

Dr Amey said good oral health started with the individual. She urged people to prevent problems like decay and holes by brushing and flossing regularly.

Dr Amey’s passion for her work started when as a St John’s College student she also worked part-time as a dental assistant. After completing her studies with Charles Sturt University at Orange, she joined the Wingewarra Dental team.

“I always thought, it was always such a long wait to get into the dentist and people would travel so far, from further west,” she said.

“So I really wanted to come back and give back to Dubbo.

“Dubbo’s been really good to me when I was growing up and it’s now my time to give back.”

Survey results that showed 68 per cent of people said they only visited the dentist when they had specific problems were a “massive concern” to Dr Amey.

“Within two years so much can change with the mouth,” she said.

Avoiding the dentist can lead to high costs for patients in the long run.

“...coming to the dentist once a year for a general check-up and some cleaning, as well as some good oral hygiene advice stops things like holes from coming,” Dr Amey said.

“So what I like to say is coming to the dentist is not expensive, neglect is expensive.”

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