Taronga Western Plains Zoo interim leader Nick Boyle ready for challenge

Strong connections: Nick Boyle steps out as interim director of Taronga Western Plains Zoo, the venue of his primary school excursions. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE.

Strong connections: Nick Boyle steps out as interim director of Taronga Western Plains Zoo, the venue of his primary school excursions. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE.

The new interim leader of Taronga Western Plains Zoo says he is looking forward to the challenge and is considering applying for the permanent role.

Nick Boyle has begun the first week of his four-month appointment at the helm of the organisation.

The top job at Dubbo’s premier tourist attraction became vacant earlier this month with the resignation of director Matthew Fuller, who will move on to a role with Roads and Maritime Services.

Mr Boyle has been appointed as interim director while a more extensive search is undertaken to fill the position long-term.

He has had responsibilities across both the Dubbo and Sydney Taronga sites during his 10 years with the organisation and said he was excited and proud to serve as interim director.

“...I’m in the role for four months and I’m looking forward to sinking my teeth into some of the projects,” he said.

He’s not ruling out a future with Taronga Western Plains Zoo beyond the four months.

“I would be honoured and privileged to apply and I am considering putting my hat in the ring,” he said.

Mr Boyle hit the ground running, on Thursday hosting the Daily Liberal at the site of a new $9 million African Lion Pridelands exhibit that is under construction.

But the zoo at Dubbo is familiar territory for the man who originally hails from a farm at Wee Waa.

“This is the zoo I grew up with,” Mr Boyle said.

“I have such a connection with this place.

“My year 4 excursion, my year 5 excursion and I’ve still got photos from the little disposable camera I took around on those excursions.

“I have such a connection with NSW generally, north-western NSW and central-western NSW but in terms of animal experiences and why I got into this industry, this place plays a big part in that.”

Mr Fuller had a total of 12 years as zoo director, which celebrates its 40th birthday this year.

Mr Boyle said the organisation was on a firm base.

“I think my job is to be able to build on that history and those successes and really recognise the effective and fantastic job everyone’s done out here and keep things ticking over for that time,” he said.

He encouraged the community to visit, both in the coming months and at the completion of the new lion exhibit.