Tourism gets a cultural boost | Video

An interactive Medicinal Garden has been unveiled as the latest addition to Dubbo’s tourist offering.

NEWEST ATTRACTION: Allan Hall, Lionel Wood, Michael Kneipp, Rod Towney and Peter Peckham help unveil the Medicial Garden. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

NEWEST ATTRACTION: Allan Hall, Lionel Wood, Michael Kneipp, Rod Towney and Peter Peckham help unveil the Medicial Garden. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Featuring six species of traditional plants, the garden was revealed on Friday by Dubbo Regional Council administrator Michael Kneipp and city information supervisor Kristie Hallford.

Ms Hallford said an audit had revealed the need for more indigenous attractions, and a garden next to the Visitor Information Centre was the perfect fit.

“Now it’s actually used for something that’s educational and interactive and is going to be here for a long time,” she said.

A QR code on the garden’s signage leads visitors to a Welcome to Country, delivered by local Wiradjuri elder Di McNaboe.

“It’s quite amazing that you’ve got a culture hundreds of thousands of years old and the technology is now a mobile phone in which we now download that,” Mr Kneipp said.

“This is just another little step in what Dubbo offers.”

The plants

Emu bush: “Concoctions of emu bush leaves were used to wash sores and cuts. Occasionally it was gargled and it was also used for stomach ulcers. However only in the decade, leaves from the plant were found to have the same strength as some established antibiotics in modern medicine.”

Grass tree: “Other plants like the grass tree had multiple purposes. Resin from the trunk was used in tool-making and the serrated leaves were used to make baskets. Inhaling the smoke of the flower, heads and bark was also used to aid recovery from colds. It also is a source of food with leaf bases, young flowers and roots all edible.”

For more, visit the Medicinal Garden next to the Dubbo Visitor Information Centre on Macquarie Street.

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