Rapid-build prison brings jobs as works begin

Dubbo MP and Deputy Premier Troy Grant, Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin and corrections minister David Elliott turn the first sod for a new rapid-build at Wellington Correctional Centre in August. Photo: FAYE WHEELER

Dubbo MP and Deputy Premier Troy Grant, Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin and corrections minister David Elliott turn the first sod for a new rapid-build at Wellington Correctional Centre in August. Photo: FAYE WHEELER

Consultants, subcontractors and suppliers from NSW’s central west are already playing a part in a $150 million jail expansion at Wellington and more employment for local workers is on the horizon.

Managing contractor Hansen Yuncken reported it had already engaged “a mix of local and other state-based contractors” to assist in the delivery of the rapid-build prison project.

Workers and machinery can be seen on the site at the Wellington jail, less than two months after the first sod was turned on August 5.

Sourced from the central west so far were surveyors, concrete supplies, light-weight steel structures, and hardware and office supplies, Hansen Yuncken project director Matthew O’Grady said.

“We also anticipate that some of our subcontractors may engage people from the region and in some cases team up with local subcontractors,” he said.

Applications for a number of other positions, including foreman, project/ site engineer, safety officer, leading hand carpenter and site secretary, were to close on Friday.

The company that has already delivered numerous projects in the Orange, Bathurst and Blayney districts may make further contributions to the Wellington economy.

Hansen Yuncken had investigated options for accommodation that would be required for people working on the rapid-build prison at Wellington, which would bring benefits to businesses in the central west, Mr O’Grady said.

“One of the benefits that flow from construction works is the multiplier effect, wherein people working on the project spend time during the lifecycle of the project and spend money in the local community, providing stimulus to local restaurants and clubs,” he said.

Hansen Yuncken reported contacting more than 20 organisations including bus companies to look at transport options, and the feedback to date had been “excellent”.

The company anticipated being able to fill the remaining project positions from the inquiries coming through.

New correctional centres at Wellington and Cessnock will be the first rapid-build maximum security prisons in Australia as the need for beds increases.

Dubbo Regional Council administrator Michael Kneipp said in August the jail expansion would provide a benefit for Wellington and the wider region, similar to the impact when the jail was first constructed.

“I saw the fantastic effect it had on the Wellington economy,” he said of the jail’s opening.

“This will create more than 200 jobs - some will be out of town, but they’ll also look at recruiting locally.”

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop