IPROWD students face a bright future

"THE ability to help others" was a big motivator behind Chloe Powyer's decision to enrol in the Indigenous Police Recruitment our Way Delivery (IPROWD) program

"THE ability to help others" was a big motivator behind Chloe Powyer's decision to enrol in the Indigenous Police Recruitment our Way Delivery (IPROWD) program

"THE ability to help others" was a big motivator behind Chloe Powyer's decision to enrol in the Indigenous Police Recruitment our Way Delivery (IPROWD) program, which she hopes will lead to a career in the NSW Police Force.

The 17-year-old, who is originally from Wellington, is one of 31 young Indigenous people from across Western NSW who have embarked on the course that aims to prepare them for entry to the NSW Police Academy.

Chloe is among those taking part in the 13-week program, which is also offered as a two-year TVET student course.

The students received the best wishes of NSW Governor David Hurley when he addressed them during a visit to TAFE Western's Yarradamarra Centre on Friday.

Chloe said she had been doing the course for two weeks so far and loved it.

"On the fitness side of things, I've played a bit of touch footy and I like the personal training we are involved in," she said.

"At the end I really hope that I can get a career where I can help others. I've had a lot happen to me in the past couple of years and knowing all the organisations that have helped me, I really want to give back."

Chloe said she hoped to work in an area that would help tackle domestic violence against women.

Helping others and making a positive difference to the community were also the reasons Britney Toman enrolled in the IPROWD program.

Helping others and making a positive difference to the community were also the reasons Britney Toman enrolled in the IPROWD program.

Helping others and making a positive difference to the community were also the reasons Britney Toman enrolled in the IPROWD program.

The 16-year-old, who was a keen cricketer, travelled four-and-a-half hours each way every Tuesday from her home in Murringo to take part in the IPROWD TVET program.

Britney said she hoped to join the NSW Police Force and become a detective.

Policing was in the family for Britney, who said she had "a few uncles who are cops".

Meanwhile, her mother Tammy said Britney had been incredibly excited to be taking part in the program.

"She hasn't stopped talking about it," she said.

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