A time to question firearm legislation

The depths of the tragedy that saw the lives of 20 children and seven teachers taken, is almost beyond words. 

The loss of so many young people that have not even begun to realise the potential of their lives is unutterably sad.

Australia had a similar tragedy at Port Arthur and, as a result, the prime minister of the day, John Howard, set in motion changes to laws allowing Australians to only own certain types of weapons.

 In particular, the legislation not allowing Australians to own certain types of weapons, in particular, semi-automatic firearms.

The United States of America has an attitude to gun ownership enshrined in its constitution which allows the right to bear arms. 

The war of independence against the British then the Civil War were potent reminders of this need.

But even the most ardent supporters of this constitutional right must be questioning the need for military assault weapons in the hands of the general public after this horrendous act. 

The parents and families of those killed will be beside themselves in their grief and may never know the full story as to why a young man aged just 20 committed such a heinous act.

We are sure our readers will share in this sorrow and our condolences go to those families affected and to the United States of America as a whole.

One is stunned by the brutality visited on children aged six or seven years and their teachers.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop